Profile of a 21st Century Feminist.

tumblr_nzu5thqwhe1syitgfo1_1280

I have met thousands of women of all ages, shapes, sizes, and colors in my prior careers in entertainment and in corporate America. Ironically, I never had the displeasure of meeting a vocal feminist until recently, who we’ll call Violet. Like a spoiled little child who always gets her way, Violet always seems to find something to bitch about.

Legally, women have shared equal footing with men since 1920, as the passage of our 19th Constitutional Amendment guaranteed women the right to vote. Before most of us were born, the Lucretia Mott Amendment, was first drafted by the women’s rights leader Alice Paul in 1923. Several generations later in 1972, still before most of us were born, the Senate passed a modified Amendment, which proposed banning discrimination based on sex, known as the Equal Rights Amendment. The E.R.A. was sent to the states for ratification, but it fell short of the three-fourths approval needed. Why? It was imperfect. The amendment may have adversely affected laws that favor women in child-custody and alimony cases, forced women to be called upon in a military draft, among other potential unpleasantries. And – the Amendment was largely unnecessary. Women already shared the same fundamental rights as men.

Today, a small group of very vocal and perhaps sociopathic women (led by chicks like Violet) are beating the war drums once again, acting as if they’re speaking for the masses, as if a typical college educated woman cannot speak for herself. There are some loud whispers regarding equal pay and opportunity in the corporate arena, but those are quickly dissipating as companies institute diversification programs. Regardless, today’s feminist movement is frightening. It has a strange similarity to religious fundamentalism, showing signs of an inherently flawed yet absolute conviction in one’s own exactitude. Dissenters are quickly censured by a small contingent of quite hostile yet mostly anonymous social media mavens.

So what’s the prevailing feminist argument today? Fucking cat calls. Certain women are up in arms about unknown men paying them unsolicited compliments. While a large subset of American women (no statistics available) adore being adored and have no problem with men appreciating beauty in what’s usually an innocent exchange of pleasantries, there’s that tiny little bitch regiment who believes compliments should be criminalized. If you ask me, a world in which you cannot compliment or even comment on someone’s hair, flair, or clothing, whether it is warranted or not, seems like a pretty lame world. Granted, there are stupid men who cross the line of civility, and that should never be allowed. But a simple and innocent anonymous compliment should never hurt anyone.

Who are these women? It’s difficult to tell due to their anonymity. But based on Violet’s persona, here’s my best guess.

  • White women with short hair. They get it cut to avoid male attention, because they’re probably asexual. Sexual women are much nicer in general, and tend to appreciate compliments and kind words.
  • Natural blonde women over 26. God is not kind to our fair-haired friends, and women take their wrinkle-hate out on all men to spite Him.
  • Women who have spent too much time in school to foster a professional career. She’s angry that she missed her prime mating years.
  • Black women who have lost a black man to a white girl. She’ll be angry about everything for the rest of her life.
  • Women who own cats. It’s a well-known fact that only men with homosexual tendencies appreciate felines, so a cat is yet another way to repel heterosexual male attention.
  • Women with jacked-up testosterone levels. She’s highly competitive in everything she does, including sports. She’s practically a dude, but she’s angry she’s not accepted as one.
  • Morbidly obese women (with short hair and cats). She’s tired of being chastised and called fat, and feels she doesn’t have a chance with any man anyway. She’s hoping to hook up with a natural blonde woman over 26 with short hair.

Violet meets four out of five of the above qualifications. I’ve unfriended her on Facebook, blocked her on Twitter, and avoid her like Zika in real life. There’s nothing positive at all about that woman, and I don’t have time for negative people.

Thanks to our interaction, I’ve learned you never dare tell a feminist to smile or that she looks nice, whether you mean it or not, and despite any good intention, because that always results in the bitch breathing fire.

When you think about it, today’s women have more rights than men. Think alimony, child support, cheerleading, modeling, runway modeling, and the thousands of corporate positions reserved for women in an effort to prove a company is practicing “equal opportunity.”

Fortunately, the masses are beginning to push back. I hope Violet and her underlings come to their senses and begins to realize things aren’t as bad as they think. If you’re on the fence between feminism and normalcy, these links may help you realize you’re not alone.

Here are five feminist myths that will not die: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3TR_YuDFIFI

And here’s a wonderful blog from more normal women who are against these radical feminists: http://womenagainstfeminism.tumblr.com/

Advertisements

3 comments

  1. I don’t fit in this category that you describe. Equal pay would be great, but I don’t think its need to start with men and women. It starts under that. I work the same job as my friend we are a team. I’ve been doing it much longer than her, I’m considered the head one between the two of us and she makes $5.00 an hour more than me. It just not fair.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s